#NPSOak @DallasSlam Semi-Final Bout

Thursday, we had our semifinal bout. The opposing teams were SlamNUBA! (Denver, CO), Nuyorican (New York), Legendary Collective (Santa Cruz, CA) and Da Poetry Lounge (Hollywood, CA).

The Draw:

A. Legendary Collective
B. Dallas Poetry Slam
C. Da Poetry Lounge
D. SlamNUBA
E. Nuyorican

Rules Overview:

3:00 time limit (10-second grace period).
If time limit is exceeded, 0.5 points are deducted for every 10-second increment.
5 judges score from 0.0 to 10.0
Low and high scores are dropped, and three remaining scores are totaled, with a maximum possible score of 30.0.
The sequence in rounds 2-4 are determined by the scores in the preceding round, from high to low.

Key:

The below information is presented as follows:

A (Draw). Team – Team member or “Group” if multiple performers – Topic (or “Title” if known); (Time) Score 1, Score 2, Score 3, Score 4, Score 5 = Total for round; Cumulative (after Round One)

Round One
Sac:. Eclectic Truth – Rodney – The joy of grits; (2:32) 6.6, 7, 7, 7.4, 8.3 = 21.4;
A. Legendary Collective – Gabriel – CA – Not as liberal as advertised; (2:18) 6.5, 7.5, 7.9, 8.1, 8.8 = 23.5;
B. Dallas Poetry Slam – Simon Phoenix – “My N****s”; (2:46) 8, 8.1, 8.7, 9, 9.5 = 25.8;
C. Da Poetry Lounge – Group – Slut shaming; (3:01) 8.3, 9, 9.5, 9.6, 10 = 28.1;
D. SlamNUBA – Lucifury – Show me the impossible; (3:06) 7.8, 8.5, 8.8, 9, 9.1 = 26.3;
E. Nuyorican – Falu – Why Jesus should not return; (2:51) 8.5, 9.1, 9.2, 9.4, 9.5 = 27.7;

Round Two
C. Da Poetry Lounge – Group – Social Media; (2:55) 8.7, 8.8, 9.3, 9.5, 9.6 = 27.6; 55.7
E. Nuyorican – Group – Beyonce responds to the Blue Ivy hair petition; (2:36) 8.6, 9, 9.2, 9.5, 9.7 = 27.7; 55.4
D. SlamNUBA – Group – The two sides of a female bully/male victim scenario; (2:56) 8.8, 9.4, 9.7, 9.8, 10 = 28.9; 55.2
B. Dallas Poetry Slam – Group – “Car Accident”; (2:30) 8.5, 8.5, 8.9, 9, 9.4 = 26.4; 52.2
A. Legendary Collective – Queen Jasmeen – A daughter who witnessed her mother’s death; (2:43) 9.3, 9.5, 9.7, 9.7, 9.9 = 28.9; 52.4

Round Three
A. Legendary Collective – Group – Gun control means…; (2:51) 8.5, 8.7, 8.8, 9, 9.1 = 26.5; 78.9
D. SlamNUBA – Group – Lack of racial progress; (3:06) 8.9, 9.5, 9.7, 9.7, 9.8 = 28.9; 84.1
E. Nuyorican – Group – To young black men; (3:09) 9.2, 9.3, 9.6, 9.9, 10 = 28.8; 84.2
C. Da Poetry Lounge – Group – My nipples; (0:00) 9.2, 9.3, 9.7, 9.7, 9.9 = 28.7; 84.4
B. Dallas Poetry Slam – Sarah V. – Hail Mary; (3:00) 8.8, 9, 9, 9.1, 9.2 = 27.1; 79.3

Round Four
D. SlamNUBA – Group – To the creator of the Michael Jackson and Tupac holograms; (3:05) 9.1, 9.5, 9.5, 9.6, 9.7 = 28.6; 112.7
E. Nuyorican – Roya – Body image; (2:33) 9, 9, 9.4, 9.7, 9.8 = 28.1; 112.3
C. Da Poetry Lounge – Group – My sexuality; (2:59) 9.1, 9.2, 9.3, 9.4, 9.8 = 27.9; 112.3
B. Dallas Poetry Slam – Prince Parker – Graffiti; (2:59) 9.3, 9.5, 9.5, 9.6, 10 = 28.6; 107.9
A. Legendary Collective – Kevin Holmes – In defense of S&M; (3:02) 8.7, 9, 9.2, 9.4, 9.8 = 27.6; 106.5

Bout Results

  1. SlamNUBA 112.7
  2. Da Poetry Lounge 112.3
  3. Nuyorican 112.3
  4. Dallas Poetry Slam 107.9
  5. Legendary Collective 106.5

Congratulations to SlamNUBA, as well as Urbana (New York), Beltway (Washington, DC), and Slam New Orleans, who will all be continuing to Finals. You can see results and scores of the entire tournament at http://scores.poetryslam.com, and Finals will be streamed live.

Thank you for your support, and stay tuned for future updates from Dallas Poetry Slam.

 

 

#NPSOak @DallasSlam Preliminary Bout #2

Wednesday, we had our second preliminary bout. The opposing teams were Slam New Orleans (New Orleans, LA), Austin Neo Soul (Austin, TX), and Sacred Sounds Slam (Tampa, FL).

The Draw:

A. Austin Neo Soul
B. Sacred Sounds
C. Slam New Orleans
D. Dallas Poetry Slam

Rules Overview:

3:00 time limit (10-second grace period).
If time limit is exceeded, 0.5 points are deducted for every 10-second increment.
5 judges score from 0.0 to 10.0
Low and high scores are dropped, and three remaining scores are totaled, with a maximum possible score of 30.0.
Key:

The below information is presented as follows:

A (Draw). Team – Team member or “Group” if multiple performers – Topic (or “Title” if known); (Time) Score 1, Score 2, Score 3, Score 4, Score 5 = Total for round; Cumulative (after Round One)

Round One
Sac:. Katelyn Lucas – – Self Image; (2:50) 8.7, 8.7, 9, 9.1, 9.2 = 26.8;
A. Austin Neo Soul – Group – On the phobia of black people/The fear of clowns; (2:47) 8.5, 9, 9.2, 9.2, 9.3 = 27.4;
B. Sacred Sounds – Slam – Unreported Rape; (2:45) 8.9, 9, 9, 9.2, 9.4 = 27.2;
C. Slam New Orleans – Group – Football Team – Pelicans; (2:47) 8.8, 9, 9.1, 9.2, 9.4 = 27.3;
D. Dallas Poetry Slam – Simon Phoenix – Elephant; (3:04) 8.9, 9.3, 9.5, 9.6, 9.8 = 28.4;

Round Two
C. Slam New Orleans – Group – Being the only black person; (2:42) 9.2, 9.3, 9.5, 9.6, 9.7 = 28.4; 55.7
A. Austin Neo Soul – Group – Sexual exploitation of children; (2:53) 9, 9.3, 9.6, 9.8, 9.8 = 28.7; 56.1
D. Dallas Poetry Slam – Group – 7 Places I would take Jesus upon his return; (2:55) 9.2, 9.2, 9.4, 9.6, 9.8 = 28.2; 56.6
B. Sacred Sounds – Group – Comparing Slam to a combat game; (3:04) 9.1, 9.3, 9.4, 9.5, 9.6 = 28.2; 55.4

Round Three
D. Dallas Poetry Slam – Masterpiece – “Black Star”; (2:43) 9, 9.6, 9.7, 9.8, 9.8 = 29.1; 85.7
C. Slam New Orleans – Desiree Dallagiacomo – “My Thighs”; (2:55) 9.1, 9.2, 9.3, 9.6, 9.8 = 28.1; 83.8
B. Sacred Sounds – Group – Financial drowning; (2:53) 9.1, 9.2, 9.5, 9.7, 10 = 28.4; 83.8
A. Austin Neo Soul – Brian Francis – Childhood racial ignorance is bliss; (2:45) 8.8, 9.2, 9.4, 9.6, 9.7 = 28.2; 84.3

Round Four
B. Sacred Sounds – DeTyme – Today’s Hip Hop; (2:58) 9.3, 9.4, 9.4, 9.5, 9.6 = 28.3; 112.1
D. Dallas Poetry Slam – Group – Black Man Speaks Hands; (2:45) 8.9, 9.5, 9.7, 9.7, 9.7 = 28.9; 114.6
A. Austin Neo Soul – Group – Suicide; (3:00) 9, 9.2, 9.3, 9.5, 9.9 = 28; 112.3
C. Slam New Orleans – FreeQuency – Lessons on being a black African in America; (2:49) 9.4, 9.6, 9.7, 9.8, 9.8 = 29.1; 112.9

Bout Results

  1. Dallas Poetry Slam 114.6
  2. Slam New Orleans 112.9
  3. Austin Neo Soul 112.3
  4. Sacred Sounds 112.1

While this was the final preliminary bout for Dallas, there is another night of qualifiers prior to the final announcement of teams who will proceed to semi-finals. For the next chapter in the story, check the blog section here at DallasPoetrySlam.com. Be sure to spread the word to “Like” the Facebook page and check here for updates!

You can also see results and scores of the entire tournament at http://scores.poetryslam.com.

 

 

#NPSOak @DallasSlam Preliminary Bout #1

Tuesday, we had our first preliminary bout. The opposing teams were F**k Yeah Poetry Slam (Online (SF, CA)), Urban Spoken Word (Madison, WI), and BattleBorn Poetry Slam (Las Vegas, NV).

The Draw:

A. Dallas Poetry Slam
B. Urban Spoken Word
C. Battle Born Poetry Slam
D. F**k Yeah Poetry Slam

Rules Overview:

  • 3:00 time limit (10-second grace period).
  • If time limit is exceeded, 0.5 points are deducted for every 10-second increment.
  • 5 judges score from 0.0 to 10.0
  • Low and high scores are dropped, and three remaining scores are totaled, with a maximum possible score of 30.0.

Key:

The below information is presented as follows:

A (Draw). Team – Team member or “Group” if multiple performers – Topic (or “Title” if known); (Time) Score 1, Score 2, Score 3, Score 4, Score 5 = Total for round; Cumulative (after Round One)

Round One
Sac: Tanya – Misrepresentation of minorities in movies; (2:51) 6.5, 7.8, 7.9, 8.2, 8.9 = 23.9;
A. Dallas Poetry Slam – Simon Phoenix – “Malcolm’s Ghost Speaks”; (3:00) 8.1, 8.4, 8.9, 8.9, 9.2 = 26.2;
B. Urban Spoken Word – Stephen Steele – Three minutes; (2:46) 3.5, 7, 7.4, 7.6, 7.9 = 22;
C. Battle Born Poetry Slam – Vogue Robinson – Body image; (2:04) 8.4, 8.6, 8.8, 9.3, 9.5 = 26.7;
D. F**k Yeah Poetry Slam – Paul Canada – If Jesus was a drag queen; (2:58) 8.1, 8.1, 8.3, 8.5, 9.1 = 24.9;

Round Two
C. Battle Born Poetry Slam – Alexandra Murphy – Relationship; (3:07) 7.8, 7.8, 8.5, 8.8, 9 = 25.1; 51.8
A. Dallas Poetry Slam – Sarah V – “Arizona”; (2:47) 8.5, 8.6, 9.1, 9.2, 9.8 = 26.9; 53.1
D. F**k Yeah Poetry Slam – Javier Perez – Break out of the box they put you in; (2:39) 7.3, 7.8, 8, 8, 8.1 = 23.8; 48.7
B. Urban Spoken Word – Caitlin MacGahan – Full figured body image; (1:58) 7.5, 7.7, 7.9, 7.9, 8.5 = 23.5; 45.5

Round Three
D. F**k Yeah Poetry Slam – Michael Shaeffer – To the new guy; (2:17) 7.1, 7.8, 8, 8.4, 8.5 = 24.2; 72.9
C. Battle Born Poetry Slam – AJ Moyer – A scientist’s take on love; (2:42) 8.1, 8.3, 8.9, 9.3, 9.3 = 26.5; 78.3
B. Urban Spoken Word – Abigail Swetz – LGBT Marriage; (2:51) 8.1, 8.3, 8.4, 8.9, 9 = 25.6; 71.1
A. Dallas Poetry Slam – Masterpiece – “Stretch”; (2:53) 9.2, 9.2, 9.3, 9.6, 9.9 = 28.1; 81.2

Round Four
B. Urban Spoken Word – Mikkel Snyder – Superman listens to Kanye West; (2:48) 7.5, 8.1, 8.2, 8.6, 9 = 24.9; 96
D. F**k Yeah Poetry Slam – Sam Hansen – Angrily missing you (the countdown); (2:52) 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, 8.6, 9.2 = 25.7; 98.6
A. Dallas Poetry Slam – Prince Parker – “Bully”; (2:43) 8.5, 8.9, 9, 9.1, 9.3 = 27; 108.2
C. Battle Born Poetry Slam – Group – The next evolution/Social disconnection; (2:49) 8.6, 8.9, 9.2, 9.3, 9.4 = 27.4; 105.7

 

Bout Results
1. Dallas Poetry Slam 108.2
2. Battle Born Poetry Slam 105.7
3. F**k Yeah Poetry Slam 98.6
4. Urban Spoken Word 96.0

 

Our next bout is on Wednesday against Slam New Orleans (New Orleans, LA), Austin Neo Soul (Austin, TX), and Sacred Sounds Slam (Tampa, FL). For results, check the blog section here at DallasPoetrySlam.com. Be sure to spread the word to “Like” the Facebook page and check here for updates!

You can also see results and scores of the entire tournament at http://scores.poetryslam.com.

 

 

Feature Spotlight: Michael Hatcher

6592

We are thrilled to bring back one of our favorite types of posts, the Feature Spotlight. We ask featured artists some questions that allow us to get to know them better, so that we know what to look forward to. This time around, we’re shining the light on the extraordinary Michael Hatcher, the WordSpace Third Fridays at Dallas Poetry Slam feature for Friday, May 16, 2014.

 

  1. Where are you from?
    I’m from Fort Worth. I grew up on the eastside in the glorious Meadowbrook area.
  2. How did you get your name?
    It was on my birth certificate.
  3. How would you describe your poetry for someone if they have never seen or heard you before?
    I would describe it as “Michael Hatcherish.” If you knew me, you would think yes, these are the things he would write.
  4. What was your first experience with poetry? What poems or poets do you remember most?
    My first experience with poetry came from My father. When I was a child he would read “If” by Rudyard Kipling to me.
  5. Who or what influences your poetry?
    A better question would be what or who doesn’t influence my poetry. My poetry is influenced by: my family, my relationships, classic poetry, television, comic books, music, movies, people’s poetry, rainy days, people with missing teeth in the front, Scooby Doo, Transformers, Malcolm X, Malcolm in the Middle, and everything I didn’t mention.
  6. What was the first poem you ever wrote? How did you feel about it?
    I wrote a poem about dying in the sixth grade. I feel indifferent about it.
  7. What made you first realize you wanted to pursue poetry?
    I was at a concert and this guy was playing the piano, another guy was singing someone was playing the guitar and the crowd was in a trance because of how beautiful the moment was.  I put an X on each one of those things as far as my talents and decided maybe I can do that poetry thing.
  8. How did you get involved with poetry?
    My cousin Nisa gave me a business card from Mike Guinn and I called the number.
  9. What can people expect to see at a live performance?
    They can expect me to give them intimate parts of my life. They can expect me to share something sacred.
  10. If you had to describe your poetry in three or four words, what would you call it?
    Personal, honest, Michael
  11. What is most of your poetry about?
    Most of my poetry is about my experiences.
  12. How long have you been writing and performing poetry?
    I’ve been writing poetry since I was 14 years old. It provided me an outlet to express frustration.  I started performing 3 years ago.
  13. What did you think your “biggest break” or “greatest opportunity” has been so far with poetry?
    My biggest break was making the 2011 Fort Worth Slam Team. I learned so much from Chris and Madden that year. Also the National Poetry Slam gave me the opportunity to see poetry from different regions on a different stage. When I came back to the DFW I was a different writer.
  14. What do you feel distinguishes you from other poets?
    I think what makes my poetry different is the fact that poems are about me. No one can write from my perspective better than I can.
  15. What was your most embarrassing moment as an artist?
    My most embarrassing moment was last year at Southern Fried I completely dropped two poems. I was just standing on stage thinking “I wanna get away.”
  16. What does your family think of your poetry and do they support you?
    My family is extremely supportive. They can be spotted in venues from Dallas to Boston in an effort to show their support.
  17. What do you do when you’re not doing poetry?
    I work. I read. I do stuff.
  18. Which poem or poems do you love to perform the most and why?
    I like to perform new poems the most because I like hearing new poems.
  19. Where would you like to see yourself within the next 3 to 5 years as an artist?
    I would like to have more work published.
  20. What do you do to get ready for a show?
    I listen to Lil Wayne’s song best rapper alive from the Carter II
  21. What is your wildest poet/poetry story?
    What happens at Nationals stays at nationals.
  22. What has been the worst nightmare for you as a poet? How did you get through it all?
    See dropping poems at Southern Fried.
  23. What is the furthest show from home that you have done?
    The furthest had to be the National Poetry Slam in Boston. 
  24. If you could perform with anyone in the world, either dead or alive, who would it be? Why?
    I would perform with Jay Electronica or I would at least have Ryuischi Sakamoto playing the piano in the background because it would be dope.
  25. How do you think you would be remembered by people if something were to suddenly happen to you?
    I think I would be remembered as someone who you couldn’t help but to love the closer you got to him.
  26. As an artist, is there anything special you hope to be able to accomplish?
    I want Write Bloody Publishing to distribute my work. That’s when I’ll say “I made it I made it.”
  27. How has your poetry evolved from your first poem to one of your recent poems?
    I used to write more for the local scene. I would rhyme and write poems with a great deal of bravado. Now I write things that are “specifically me.”
  28. What do you attribute to your “drive as an artist”?
    I got my work ethic from my mother. She will not allow you to outwork her. That’s the attitude I have. There are people with more talent but when I apply myself my drive will place me parallel with your talent.
  29. What do you think makes you and your type of poetry unique from other poets?
    It’s mine.
  30. As an artist how would you define success?
    For me success is being recognized by people who value and possess writing talent. The more people who share those traits say I write well, the more successful I feel.
  31. If you had to think of a slogan that could leave a positive impact for everyone what with your slogan be?
    Be honest.
  32. What projects or products do you have or that are in the works?
    I’m working on a chapbook. It’s titled “Things I whisper to myself in crowded rooms.
  33. Do you have any video links where people can see you? (Website/Facebook/email/etc…)
    I have video links but I would never send people to those old things.
  34. Is there anyone special you would like to think for helping you become who you are as an artist?
    Thank you Mom, Dad, Al, the other Hatchers, Inkwell, Fort Worth Slam, Dallas Slam, Big Will, Kahlil, James, Jason, Alexandra Marie, Sosh, Stacy, Natty, Des, Juju, Kayla, Madden, Chris, Gi, T. Odis, Mike Guinn, GNO, my Kansas family, my ZY Family, My N.O.G.E.  of Sudan Family, and everyone who has supported me over the years.

 

Complete the following sentences.

 

  1. Without poetry, I would be:
    a little more lame than I actually am.
  2. Poetry is:
    the natural order of things
  3. My poetry makes me feel:
    alive
  4. I write poetry because:
    I am human and it’s natural for us to create in one format or another.
  5. Support poetry because:
    I said so.

 

See Michael Hatcher, the WordSpace Third Fridays at Dallas Poetry Slam feature, on Friday, May 16, 2014.

Feature Spotlight: Sasha Banks

Sasha Banks

We are thrilled to bring back one of our favorite types of posts, the Feature Spotlight. We ask featured artists some questions that allow us to get to know them better, so that we know what to look forward to. This time around, we’re shining the light on the phenomenally talented Sasha Banks, who will be featuring on Friday, April 18, 2014.

  1. Where are you from?
    Ohio, by way of Alaska, by way of Germany, by way of California.
  2. How would you describe your poetry for someone if they have never seen or heard you before?
    All the things I’ve written about are past events that are specific to me as a woman, and a black woman—my poems/poetry is me revisiting those moments and using the words I didn’t have then, to speak on them in the now.
  3. What was your first experience with poetry? What poems or poets do you remember most?
    My first experience with poetry was actually Maya Angelou; I had to do a report on her, in 7th grade. Then I came across Def Poetry, right around that same time, and I distinctly remember watching Mos Def, Suheir Hammad, and Mayda Del Valle. I wanted to do that; I wanted my poetry to matter enough to be on a stage and read in front of people.
  4. Who or what influences your poetry?
    I love language. I speak Spanish, as well, and when I first started learning the language, I was really in love with its sentence structure. It’s very poetic, to me. I’d say that’s what really influences my poetry—all the ways that exist to say one thing or communicate one feeling. I also like to study the etymology of words and phrases, so…there’s that.
  5. What was the first poem you ever wrote? How did you feel about it?
    Ha! No clue.
  6. What made you first realize you wanted to pursue poetry?
    Earlier I mentioned Def Poetry being the thing that sparked the idea that my writing could be important to more than just me. But I think the actual want to actively pursue poetry was really a result of sharing work with people in my community, locally and elsewhere, and getting an overwhelming response. 
  7. How did you get involved with poetry?
    The poetry scene that I’m a part of now? A friend of mine told me about Natty Roots, in Arlington, and I went one time and never stopped.
  8. What can people expect to see at a live performance?
    Well, no fireworks or backup dancers. People can expect to hear honest work.
  9. If you had to describe your poetry in three or four words, what would you call it?
    Lived. Defiant. Earnest. Real.
  10. What is most of your poetry about? (What specific themes do you cover?)
    A lot of the work is really centered around womanhood, and I think recently, I’m speaking more from distinct places in black womanhood.   
  11. How long have you been writing and performing poetry?
    I’ve been writing since I was 7 (poetry since I was about 9). I’ve only been performing poetry for the last year.
  12. What did you think your “biggest break” or “greatest opportunity” has been so far with poetry?
    Making it to NPS Final Stage in 2013, as a Golden Poem Award Showcase performer was definitely my biggest “break,” without a doubt.
  13. What does your family think of your poetry and do they support you?
    My father is a military man, so…initially he wasn’t really on board. He really wanted me to join the air force. Lmao. But I think his scope of what poetry had/has the capacity to be was just narrow, until I started bringing more of it into his space, through what was happening in my life. He’s more supportive, now. My mom’s always excited and trying to tell me what I should write about next. I love it.
  14. What do you do when you’re not doing poetry?
    Watching Grey’s Anatomy; scouring the earth for 90’s hip hop on wax; crocheting; watching reruns of Living Single and the Cosby Show; flirting with the Arabic language (I want to learn Arabic sooooo bad); EATING.
  15. Which poem or poems do you love to perform the most and why?
    That’s hard to say. It changes every few months. Right now, I’m in love with a sestina I wrote, and that’s one I’ve been reading a lot, lately. I actually just performed that for Patricia Smith!
  16. Where would you like to see yourself within the next 3 to 5 years as an artist?
    Writing, traveling, performing, and teaching poetry in places beyond the US. I really see myself becoming more self-assured and finally able to understand myself, artistically. I think, then I’d be able to really dig into other aspects of poetry. It’s a process.
  17. What do you do to get ready for a show?
    Panic. Pray. Panic. Repeat.
  18. What is your wildest poet/poetry story?
    Classified information.
  19. What is the furthest show from home that you have done?
    My first show was at Dartmouth, in New Hampshire. So far, that’s been the farthest.
  20. If you could perform with anyone in the world, either dead or alive, who would it be? Why?
    Patricia Smith because she reads on page, and that’s important in more ways than I can really explain. AND! Toni Morrison, because she’s a badass, and was one of the first black women writers to address more of the unspoken experiences of black womanhood. Both of these women are also my patron saints. Just sayin.
  21. How do you think you would be remembered by people if something were to suddenly happen to you?
    I don’t know. I think people would remember the way I push my glasses up when slide down my nose. And maybe the way I hate erotic poems. lmao I don’t know.
  22. As an artist, is there anything special you hope to be able to accomplish?
    I want to create a non-profit/school curriculum cross-pollination of some sort. It’s complicated and hard to explain haha. But that’s a long-term goal.
  23. How has your poetry evolved from your first poem to one of your recent poems?
    I’m speaking more about things I’ve never really talked about; revisiting and reexamining really big and formative experiences, of which, I’ve never really understood the gravity until now. The language I have to write about those experiences is not the language I had, back when I was writing my first pieces.
  24. What do you attribute to your “drive as an artist”?
    Just my belief in the power and value of art. I think living artistically and making art a priority in my life, as someone who lives in the western world, is a real act of defiance or rebellion; it disrupts the standard and the expectation. That’s hella motivating, to me.
  25. As an artist how would you define success?
    I’m still trying to figure that out, but I think the first step in the direction of success is not trying to attain someone else’s kind of success—having your own is so important in curbing that. I think paying attention to what feeling you love most about what you do, paying attention to what you do that makes you feel like you’re engaging all your best selves and best qualities, and paying attention to what you always say “yes” and “no” to are all ways to narrow what your idea of success is, at least, grounded in.
  26. What projects or products do you have or that are in the works?
    I’ve just started working on a book manuscript, so there’s a lot of drafting and researching going on.
  27. Do you have any video links where people can see you?
    Turn | TGS 2013
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHNgOukCqtc
    Pretty Girl Mouth | TGS 2013
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ut0l7osFVuM
  28. Is there anyone special you would like to thank for helping you become who you are as an artist?
    I have so many supporters in the local and national poetry scene. Thank you thank you thank you thank you thank you. And again.

 

Complete the following sentences.

  1. Without poetry, I would be:
    bored.
  2. Poetry is:
    the hardest art.
  3. My poetry makes me feel:
    nervous about whether or not I’m being heard.
  4. I write poetry because:
    that’s how I orient myself.
  5. Support poetry because:
    it’s the one of the few genuine ways to keep history—through storytelling.

See Sasha Banks, the WordSpace Third Fridays at Dallas Poetry Slam feature, on Friday, April 18, 2014.

Founded in 1994 by Clebo Rainey and his wife Naomi, Dallas Poetry Slam is the oldest and most respected Poetry Slam in the Metroplex.