Feature Spotlight: FATIMA

photo1Welcome to this edition of one of our favorite types of posts, the Feature Spotlight. We ask featured artists some questions that allow us to get to know them better, so that we know what to look forward to. This time around, we’re shining the light on the phenomenal Fatima, the WordSpace Third Fridays at Dallas Poetry Slam feature for Friday, November 21, 2014.

 

  1. Where are you from?

I was born in Miami, FL

  1. How did you get your name (if a stage name is used)?

I use my given name because I am not separate from what I do on the page or on stage. As a kid, I got teased for my name and all the weight it carried.  I wanted to be Sarah or Jessica or Christina. Today, I only want to be Fatima. I think that’s big.

  1. How would you describe your poetry for someone if they have never seen or heard you before?

Adult bedtime stories. The kind that keep you up at night because the monster was too real.

  1. What was your first experience with poetry? What poems or poets do you remember most?

In fourth grade I we learned about limericks. I was hooked. My first poems were about UFOs and bee stings. The next year my stepdad surprised me with my first Shel Silverstein collection, Where the Sidewalk Ends, and then I started junior high reading William Blake. To this day, the only poem by someone else I have memorized is The Tyger.

  1. Who or what influences your poetry?

A lot of my poems are, or at least begin, as retellings of dreams I had the night before. I believe that unseen forces influence our lives, and they definitely influence my poetry.

  1. What was the first poem you ever wrote? How did you feel about it?

The first poem I wrote as a real pouring of feelings was Death’s Serenade. It was a persona piece spoken in the voice of Death to an older woman on her deathbed. He recounted her major moments in life with great compassion and welcomed her into his arms. I was thirteen.

  1. What made you first realize you wanted to pursue poetry?

For the longest time poetry was something between myself and my notebook. I started posting it on a blog and sharing it in public places and got really positive responses. It’s gone from a hobby before bed to a major part of my life.

  1. How did you get involved with poetry?

I friended one of my coworkers and saw him post a poem a day from his blog. I thought, “I write a poem every day, too, why don’t I do that?” From there, he introduced me to some amazing people and doors just started opening. He went from coworker to mentor and now I’m able to build important relationships on my own and seek out the opportunities that make life beautiful.

  1. What can people expect to see at a live performance?

Tears. A part of me that is usually not seen by others in daily life.

  1. If you had to describe your poetry in three or four words, what would you call it?

Surprising

Emotional

Without boundaries

  1. What is most of your poetry about? (What specific themes do you cover?)

Family, motherhood, spirituality, and current events.

  1. How long have you been writing and performing poetry?

I’ve been writing since I was a kid. I’ve only been performing for about two years.

  1. What did you think your “biggest break” or “greatest opportunity” has been so far with poetry?

Poetry made me a teacher. I love children, and the Writer’s Garret has made my life so much more fulfilling. Watching kids mull over just the right word and then eagerly share some REAL stuff they didn’t wake up intending to express, there’s nothing like that. There’s nothing like watching kids pat each other on the shoulder as a sign of ::I see you, I’m here for you::

  1. What do you feel distinguishes you from other poets?

I have no limits. I feel what I feel unapologetically. I write for myself as a release; I’m not here to please an audience or make the crowd happy. I’m here so you can feel all the feelings with me and know me better.

  1. What does your family think of your poetry and do they support you?

They’re all very supportive.

  1. What do you do when you’re not doing poetry?

I read, meet friends for lunch, and water my kale. I have a love/hate relationship with Netflix.

  1. Which poem or poems do you love to perform the most and why?

I strive for variety when I perform. I don’t get on stage much, so when I do I like to show a part of myself no one’s seen before. As people we are constantly evolving and it should reflect in our work.

  1. Where would you like to see yourself within the next 3 to 5 years as an artist?

I want to be a Cave Canem fellow. I want my work on the shelves of bookstores. I want to spend every day inside of a classroom teaching kids the value of words.

  1. What do you do to get ready for a show?

I don’t have a set list I marry. I end up performing whatever I feel in the moment. I find somewhere quiet for a few minutes and try to connect with the universe. I ask for help being clear and making the audience forget they’re in a crowded room.

  1. What is your wildest poet/poetry story?

Ha, I guess I’m pretty boring! I don’t really have any crazy stories.

  1. What is the furthest show from home that you have done?

I was a Special Guest Poet at the 2014 Austin International Poetry Festival.

  1. If you could perform with anyone in the world, either dead or alive, who would it be? Why?

Shel Silverstein. I love his darkness. He’s primarily known for the poetry he wrote for kids that comes off as really silly and whimsical, but they can be pretty intense, too. He was also a musician, and in that world his new moon shined in all its dark glory. I think if we brought our love for kids together and mixed it with our shadow selves we could make the beautiful parts of nightmares.

  1. How do you think you would be remembered by people if something were to suddenly happen to you?

She always wore a flower. Why is there no poetry in my newsfeed anymore? Oh.

;-)

  1. As an artist, is there anything special you hope to be able to accomplish?

If I can inspire others, especially children, to write and value language as an art medium, I’ll be more than happy.

  1. How has your poetry evolved from your first poem to one of your recent poems?

The first poems I shared as an adult were pretty tame—mundane stuff from daily life. I was afraid to go deeper for a while. I’m not afraid to be naked anymore, at all.

  1. What do you attribute to your “drive as an artist”?

A lot of the times I don’t feel driven. It’s hard to write—not because I have writer’s block or no material, but because the stuff is just so heavy I don’t know that I feel like going there or if I’m ready. Writing is emotionally exhausting, but the end result is so rewarding. So I guess closure is the answer. That breath you take after you put the pen down, that’s what drives me. The sense of peace that comes at the end of a poem.

  1. What do you think makes you and your type of poetry unique from other poets?

I think my view of spirituality is unique. I’ve also lived in a lot of different environments and seen things that surprise people who read my work. I think the wrapping paper hides what’s inside the box really well. I think people see me and see the flower in my hair and talk about my sweet smile, and then I get on stage and ruin everything they thought they knew about me.

  1. As an artist how would you define success?

Happiness. The feeling of being full, and content, and not wanting any more than what you have.

  1. If you had to think of a slogan that could leave a positive impact for everyone what with your slogan be?

I think the Golden Rule sums it up pretty well. I think some version of it is in most world religions for a reason.

  1. What projects or products do you have or that are in the works?

My focus for the next year is submitting my work to publications and reworking my manuscript. I’d like to do more spoken word with musicians. I have friends that compose a project called Momentary Gamelan Ensemble and they’ve invited me to do spontaneous poetry to their sounds. I like the fluidity of that kind of thing and would definitely like to do more of it—surprising yourself with what words you give an audience is pretty fun.

  1. Do you have any video links where people can see you? (Website/Facebook/email/etc…)

flowerwordspoetry.com

  1. Is there anyone special you would like to thank for helping you become who you are as an artist?

Don Whittington. He’s the old man that encouraged me to share what I have with others. I love him. Growing up as the oldest of five gave me a maturity that I hope shows in my work.  The women in my life, my mother and my nana, who read to me each night definitely started this love affair with words. My mom was a nurse, and when she had to work at night she left her voice in a tape recorder that picked up the story from where we left off the night before. All I had to do was push PLAY.

 

Complete the following sentences.

  1. Without poetry, I would be: an emotional wreck with no outlet.
  2. Poetry is: everywhere.
  3. My poetry makes me feel: all the things, and then some.
  4. I write poetry because: I have no choice.
  5. Support poetry because: you will feel more connected to your world.

 

Is there anything else that you would like to share with our readers?

Thank you for reading! Thank you for supporting art in your community <3

#NPSOak @DallasSlam Semi-Final Bout

Thursday, we had our semifinal bout. The opposing teams were SlamNUBA! (Denver, CO), Nuyorican (New York), Legendary Collective (Santa Cruz, CA) and Da Poetry Lounge (Hollywood, CA).

The Draw:

A. Legendary Collective
B. Dallas Poetry Slam
C. Da Poetry Lounge
D. SlamNUBA
E. Nuyorican

Rules Overview:

3:00 time limit (10-second grace period).
If time limit is exceeded, 0.5 points are deducted for every 10-second increment.
5 judges score from 0.0 to 10.0
Low and high scores are dropped, and three remaining scores are totaled, with a maximum possible score of 30.0.
The sequence in rounds 2-4 are determined by the scores in the preceding round, from high to low.

Key:

The below information is presented as follows:

A (Draw). Team – Team member or “Group” if multiple performers – Topic (or “Title” if known); (Time) Score 1, Score 2, Score 3, Score 4, Score 5 = Total for round; Cumulative (after Round One)

Round One
Sac:. Eclectic Truth – Rodney – The joy of grits; (2:32) 6.6, 7, 7, 7.4, 8.3 = 21.4;
A. Legendary Collective – Gabriel – CA – Not as liberal as advertised; (2:18) 6.5, 7.5, 7.9, 8.1, 8.8 = 23.5;
B. Dallas Poetry Slam – Simon Phoenix – “My N****s”; (2:46) 8, 8.1, 8.7, 9, 9.5 = 25.8;
C. Da Poetry Lounge – Group – Slut shaming; (3:01) 8.3, 9, 9.5, 9.6, 10 = 28.1;
D. SlamNUBA – Lucifury – Show me the impossible; (3:06) 7.8, 8.5, 8.8, 9, 9.1 = 26.3;
E. Nuyorican – Falu – Why Jesus should not return; (2:51) 8.5, 9.1, 9.2, 9.4, 9.5 = 27.7;

Round Two
C. Da Poetry Lounge – Group – Social Media; (2:55) 8.7, 8.8, 9.3, 9.5, 9.6 = 27.6; 55.7
E. Nuyorican – Group – Beyonce responds to the Blue Ivy hair petition; (2:36) 8.6, 9, 9.2, 9.5, 9.7 = 27.7; 55.4
D. SlamNUBA – Group – The two sides of a female bully/male victim scenario; (2:56) 8.8, 9.4, 9.7, 9.8, 10 = 28.9; 55.2
B. Dallas Poetry Slam – Group – “Car Accident”; (2:30) 8.5, 8.5, 8.9, 9, 9.4 = 26.4; 52.2
A. Legendary Collective – Queen Jasmeen – A daughter who witnessed her mother’s death; (2:43) 9.3, 9.5, 9.7, 9.7, 9.9 = 28.9; 52.4

Round Three
A. Legendary Collective – Group – Gun control means…; (2:51) 8.5, 8.7, 8.8, 9, 9.1 = 26.5; 78.9
D. SlamNUBA – Group – Lack of racial progress; (3:06) 8.9, 9.5, 9.7, 9.7, 9.8 = 28.9; 84.1
E. Nuyorican – Group – To young black men; (3:09) 9.2, 9.3, 9.6, 9.9, 10 = 28.8; 84.2
C. Da Poetry Lounge – Group – My nipples; (0:00) 9.2, 9.3, 9.7, 9.7, 9.9 = 28.7; 84.4
B. Dallas Poetry Slam – Sarah V. – Hail Mary; (3:00) 8.8, 9, 9, 9.1, 9.2 = 27.1; 79.3

Round Four
D. SlamNUBA – Group – To the creator of the Michael Jackson and Tupac holograms; (3:05) 9.1, 9.5, 9.5, 9.6, 9.7 = 28.6; 112.7
E. Nuyorican – Roya – Body image; (2:33) 9, 9, 9.4, 9.7, 9.8 = 28.1; 112.3
C. Da Poetry Lounge – Group – My sexuality; (2:59) 9.1, 9.2, 9.3, 9.4, 9.8 = 27.9; 112.3
B. Dallas Poetry Slam – Prince Parker – Graffiti; (2:59) 9.3, 9.5, 9.5, 9.6, 10 = 28.6; 107.9
A. Legendary Collective – Kevin Holmes – In defense of S&M; (3:02) 8.7, 9, 9.2, 9.4, 9.8 = 27.6; 106.5

Bout Results

  1. SlamNUBA 112.7
  2. Da Poetry Lounge 112.3
  3. Nuyorican 112.3
  4. Dallas Poetry Slam 107.9
  5. Legendary Collective 106.5

Congratulations to SlamNUBA, as well as Urbana (New York), Beltway (Washington, DC), and Slam New Orleans, who will all be continuing to Finals. You can see results and scores of the entire tournament at http://scores.poetryslam.com, and Finals will be streamed live.

Thank you for your support, and stay tuned for future updates from Dallas Poetry Slam.

 

 

#NPSOak @DallasSlam Preliminary Bout #2

Wednesday, we had our second preliminary bout. The opposing teams were Slam New Orleans (New Orleans, LA), Austin Neo Soul (Austin, TX), and Sacred Sounds Slam (Tampa, FL).

The Draw:

A. Austin Neo Soul
B. Sacred Sounds
C. Slam New Orleans
D. Dallas Poetry Slam

Rules Overview:

3:00 time limit (10-second grace period).
If time limit is exceeded, 0.5 points are deducted for every 10-second increment.
5 judges score from 0.0 to 10.0
Low and high scores are dropped, and three remaining scores are totaled, with a maximum possible score of 30.0.
Key:

The below information is presented as follows:

A (Draw). Team – Team member or “Group” if multiple performers – Topic (or “Title” if known); (Time) Score 1, Score 2, Score 3, Score 4, Score 5 = Total for round; Cumulative (after Round One)

Round One
Sac:. Katelyn Lucas – – Self Image; (2:50) 8.7, 8.7, 9, 9.1, 9.2 = 26.8;
A. Austin Neo Soul – Group – On the phobia of black people/The fear of clowns; (2:47) 8.5, 9, 9.2, 9.2, 9.3 = 27.4;
B. Sacred Sounds – Slam – Unreported Rape; (2:45) 8.9, 9, 9, 9.2, 9.4 = 27.2;
C. Slam New Orleans – Group – Football Team – Pelicans; (2:47) 8.8, 9, 9.1, 9.2, 9.4 = 27.3;
D. Dallas Poetry Slam – Simon Phoenix – Elephant; (3:04) 8.9, 9.3, 9.5, 9.6, 9.8 = 28.4;

Round Two
C. Slam New Orleans – Group – Being the only black person; (2:42) 9.2, 9.3, 9.5, 9.6, 9.7 = 28.4; 55.7
A. Austin Neo Soul – Group – Sexual exploitation of children; (2:53) 9, 9.3, 9.6, 9.8, 9.8 = 28.7; 56.1
D. Dallas Poetry Slam – Group – 7 Places I would take Jesus upon his return; (2:55) 9.2, 9.2, 9.4, 9.6, 9.8 = 28.2; 56.6
B. Sacred Sounds – Group – Comparing Slam to a combat game; (3:04) 9.1, 9.3, 9.4, 9.5, 9.6 = 28.2; 55.4

Round Three
D. Dallas Poetry Slam – Masterpiece – “Black Star”; (2:43) 9, 9.6, 9.7, 9.8, 9.8 = 29.1; 85.7
C. Slam New Orleans – Desiree Dallagiacomo – “My Thighs”; (2:55) 9.1, 9.2, 9.3, 9.6, 9.8 = 28.1; 83.8
B. Sacred Sounds – Group – Financial drowning; (2:53) 9.1, 9.2, 9.5, 9.7, 10 = 28.4; 83.8
A. Austin Neo Soul – Brian Francis – Childhood racial ignorance is bliss; (2:45) 8.8, 9.2, 9.4, 9.6, 9.7 = 28.2; 84.3

Round Four
B. Sacred Sounds – DeTyme – Today’s Hip Hop; (2:58) 9.3, 9.4, 9.4, 9.5, 9.6 = 28.3; 112.1
D. Dallas Poetry Slam – Group – Black Man Speaks Hands; (2:45) 8.9, 9.5, 9.7, 9.7, 9.7 = 28.9; 114.6
A. Austin Neo Soul – Group – Suicide; (3:00) 9, 9.2, 9.3, 9.5, 9.9 = 28; 112.3
C. Slam New Orleans – FreeQuency – Lessons on being a black African in America; (2:49) 9.4, 9.6, 9.7, 9.8, 9.8 = 29.1; 112.9

Bout Results

  1. Dallas Poetry Slam 114.6
  2. Slam New Orleans 112.9
  3. Austin Neo Soul 112.3
  4. Sacred Sounds 112.1

While this was the final preliminary bout for Dallas, there is another night of qualifiers prior to the final announcement of teams who will proceed to semi-finals. For the next chapter in the story, check the blog section here at DallasPoetrySlam.com. Be sure to spread the word to “Like” the Facebook page and check here for updates!

You can also see results and scores of the entire tournament at http://scores.poetryslam.com.

 

 

#NPSOak @DallasSlam Preliminary Bout #1

Tuesday, we had our first preliminary bout. The opposing teams were F**k Yeah Poetry Slam (Online (SF, CA)), Urban Spoken Word (Madison, WI), and BattleBorn Poetry Slam (Las Vegas, NV).

The Draw:

A. Dallas Poetry Slam
B. Urban Spoken Word
C. Battle Born Poetry Slam
D. F**k Yeah Poetry Slam

Rules Overview:

  • 3:00 time limit (10-second grace period).
  • If time limit is exceeded, 0.5 points are deducted for every 10-second increment.
  • 5 judges score from 0.0 to 10.0
  • Low and high scores are dropped, and three remaining scores are totaled, with a maximum possible score of 30.0.

Key:

The below information is presented as follows:

A (Draw). Team – Team member or “Group” if multiple performers – Topic (or “Title” if known); (Time) Score 1, Score 2, Score 3, Score 4, Score 5 = Total for round; Cumulative (after Round One)

Round One
Sac: Tanya – Misrepresentation of minorities in movies; (2:51) 6.5, 7.8, 7.9, 8.2, 8.9 = 23.9;
A. Dallas Poetry Slam – Simon Phoenix – “Malcolm’s Ghost Speaks”; (3:00) 8.1, 8.4, 8.9, 8.9, 9.2 = 26.2;
B. Urban Spoken Word – Stephen Steele – Three minutes; (2:46) 3.5, 7, 7.4, 7.6, 7.9 = 22;
C. Battle Born Poetry Slam – Vogue Robinson – Body image; (2:04) 8.4, 8.6, 8.8, 9.3, 9.5 = 26.7;
D. F**k Yeah Poetry Slam – Paul Canada – If Jesus was a drag queen; (2:58) 8.1, 8.1, 8.3, 8.5, 9.1 = 24.9;

Round Two
C. Battle Born Poetry Slam – Alexandra Murphy – Relationship; (3:07) 7.8, 7.8, 8.5, 8.8, 9 = 25.1; 51.8
A. Dallas Poetry Slam – Sarah V – “Arizona”; (2:47) 8.5, 8.6, 9.1, 9.2, 9.8 = 26.9; 53.1
D. F**k Yeah Poetry Slam – Javier Perez – Break out of the box they put you in; (2:39) 7.3, 7.8, 8, 8, 8.1 = 23.8; 48.7
B. Urban Spoken Word – Caitlin MacGahan – Full figured body image; (1:58) 7.5, 7.7, 7.9, 7.9, 8.5 = 23.5; 45.5

Round Three
D. F**k Yeah Poetry Slam – Michael Shaeffer – To the new guy; (2:17) 7.1, 7.8, 8, 8.4, 8.5 = 24.2; 72.9
C. Battle Born Poetry Slam – AJ Moyer – A scientist’s take on love; (2:42) 8.1, 8.3, 8.9, 9.3, 9.3 = 26.5; 78.3
B. Urban Spoken Word – Abigail Swetz – LGBT Marriage; (2:51) 8.1, 8.3, 8.4, 8.9, 9 = 25.6; 71.1
A. Dallas Poetry Slam – Masterpiece – “Stretch”; (2:53) 9.2, 9.2, 9.3, 9.6, 9.9 = 28.1; 81.2

Round Four
B. Urban Spoken Word – Mikkel Snyder – Superman listens to Kanye West; (2:48) 7.5, 8.1, 8.2, 8.6, 9 = 24.9; 96
D. F**k Yeah Poetry Slam – Sam Hansen – Angrily missing you (the countdown); (2:52) 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, 8.6, 9.2 = 25.7; 98.6
A. Dallas Poetry Slam – Prince Parker – “Bully”; (2:43) 8.5, 8.9, 9, 9.1, 9.3 = 27; 108.2
C. Battle Born Poetry Slam – Group – The next evolution/Social disconnection; (2:49) 8.6, 8.9, 9.2, 9.3, 9.4 = 27.4; 105.7

 

Bout Results
1. Dallas Poetry Slam 108.2
2. Battle Born Poetry Slam 105.7
3. F**k Yeah Poetry Slam 98.6
4. Urban Spoken Word 96.0

 

Our next bout is on Wednesday against Slam New Orleans (New Orleans, LA), Austin Neo Soul (Austin, TX), and Sacred Sounds Slam (Tampa, FL). For results, check the blog section here at DallasPoetrySlam.com. Be sure to spread the word to “Like” the Facebook page and check here for updates!

You can also see results and scores of the entire tournament at http://scores.poetryslam.com.

 

 

Feature Spotlight: Michael Hatcher

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We are thrilled to bring back one of our favorite types of posts, the Feature Spotlight. We ask featured artists some questions that allow us to get to know them better, so that we know what to look forward to. This time around, we’re shining the light on the extraordinary Michael Hatcher, the WordSpace Third Fridays at Dallas Poetry Slam feature for Friday, May 16, 2014.

 

  1. Where are you from?
    I’m from Fort Worth. I grew up on the eastside in the glorious Meadowbrook area.
  2. How did you get your name?
    It was on my birth certificate.
  3. How would you describe your poetry for someone if they have never seen or heard you before?
    I would describe it as “Michael Hatcherish.” If you knew me, you would think yes, these are the things he would write.
  4. What was your first experience with poetry? What poems or poets do you remember most?
    My first experience with poetry came from My father. When I was a child he would read “If” by Rudyard Kipling to me.
  5. Who or what influences your poetry?
    A better question would be what or who doesn’t influence my poetry. My poetry is influenced by: my family, my relationships, classic poetry, television, comic books, music, movies, people’s poetry, rainy days, people with missing teeth in the front, Scooby Doo, Transformers, Malcolm X, Malcolm in the Middle, and everything I didn’t mention.
  6. What was the first poem you ever wrote? How did you feel about it?
    I wrote a poem about dying in the sixth grade. I feel indifferent about it.
  7. What made you first realize you wanted to pursue poetry?
    I was at a concert and this guy was playing the piano, another guy was singing someone was playing the guitar and the crowd was in a trance because of how beautiful the moment was.  I put an X on each one of those things as far as my talents and decided maybe I can do that poetry thing.
  8. How did you get involved with poetry?
    My cousin Nisa gave me a business card from Mike Guinn and I called the number.
  9. What can people expect to see at a live performance?
    They can expect me to give them intimate parts of my life. They can expect me to share something sacred.
  10. If you had to describe your poetry in three or four words, what would you call it?
    Personal, honest, Michael
  11. What is most of your poetry about?
    Most of my poetry is about my experiences.
  12. How long have you been writing and performing poetry?
    I’ve been writing poetry since I was 14 years old. It provided me an outlet to express frustration.  I started performing 3 years ago.
  13. What did you think your “biggest break” or “greatest opportunity” has been so far with poetry?
    My biggest break was making the 2011 Fort Worth Slam Team. I learned so much from Chris and Madden that year. Also the National Poetry Slam gave me the opportunity to see poetry from different regions on a different stage. When I came back to the DFW I was a different writer.
  14. What do you feel distinguishes you from other poets?
    I think what makes my poetry different is the fact that poems are about me. No one can write from my perspective better than I can.
  15. What was your most embarrassing moment as an artist?
    My most embarrassing moment was last year at Southern Fried I completely dropped two poems. I was just standing on stage thinking “I wanna get away.”
  16. What does your family think of your poetry and do they support you?
    My family is extremely supportive. They can be spotted in venues from Dallas to Boston in an effort to show their support.
  17. What do you do when you’re not doing poetry?
    I work. I read. I do stuff.
  18. Which poem or poems do you love to perform the most and why?
    I like to perform new poems the most because I like hearing new poems.
  19. Where would you like to see yourself within the next 3 to 5 years as an artist?
    I would like to have more work published.
  20. What do you do to get ready for a show?
    I listen to Lil Wayne’s song best rapper alive from the Carter II
  21. What is your wildest poet/poetry story?
    What happens at Nationals stays at nationals.
  22. What has been the worst nightmare for you as a poet? How did you get through it all?
    See dropping poems at Southern Fried.
  23. What is the furthest show from home that you have done?
    The furthest had to be the National Poetry Slam in Boston. 
  24. If you could perform with anyone in the world, either dead or alive, who would it be? Why?
    I would perform with Jay Electronica or I would at least have Ryuischi Sakamoto playing the piano in the background because it would be dope.
  25. How do you think you would be remembered by people if something were to suddenly happen to you?
    I think I would be remembered as someone who you couldn’t help but to love the closer you got to him.
  26. As an artist, is there anything special you hope to be able to accomplish?
    I want Write Bloody Publishing to distribute my work. That’s when I’ll say “I made it I made it.”
  27. How has your poetry evolved from your first poem to one of your recent poems?
    I used to write more for the local scene. I would rhyme and write poems with a great deal of bravado. Now I write things that are “specifically me.”
  28. What do you attribute to your “drive as an artist”?
    I got my work ethic from my mother. She will not allow you to outwork her. That’s the attitude I have. There are people with more talent but when I apply myself my drive will place me parallel with your talent.
  29. What do you think makes you and your type of poetry unique from other poets?
    It’s mine.
  30. As an artist how would you define success?
    For me success is being recognized by people who value and possess writing talent. The more people who share those traits say I write well, the more successful I feel.
  31. If you had to think of a slogan that could leave a positive impact for everyone what with your slogan be?
    Be honest.
  32. What projects or products do you have or that are in the works?
    I’m working on a chapbook. It’s titled “Things I whisper to myself in crowded rooms.
  33. Do you have any video links where people can see you? (Website/Facebook/email/etc…)
    I have video links but I would never send people to those old things.
  34. Is there anyone special you would like to think for helping you become who you are as an artist?
    Thank you Mom, Dad, Al, the other Hatchers, Inkwell, Fort Worth Slam, Dallas Slam, Big Will, Kahlil, James, Jason, Alexandra Marie, Sosh, Stacy, Natty, Des, Juju, Kayla, Madden, Chris, Gi, T. Odis, Mike Guinn, GNO, my Kansas family, my ZY Family, My N.O.G.E.  of Sudan Family, and everyone who has supported me over the years.

 

Complete the following sentences.

 

  1. Without poetry, I would be:
    a little more lame than I actually am.
  2. Poetry is:
    the natural order of things
  3. My poetry makes me feel:
    alive
  4. I write poetry because:
    I am human and it’s natural for us to create in one format or another.
  5. Support poetry because:
    I said so.

 

See Michael Hatcher, the WordSpace Third Fridays at Dallas Poetry Slam feature, on Friday, May 16, 2014.

Founded in 1994 by Clebo Rainey and his wife Naomi, Dallas Poetry Slam is the oldest and most respected Poetry Slam in the Metroplex.